ArcelorMittal has announced plans to set up a pilot electrolysis plant and a hydrogen filling station at its Eisenhutternstadt site in Germany, together with energy supplier Vulkan Energiewirtschaft Oderbrucke (VEO), and plant supplier McPhy Energy.

The plant will feature a total power capacity of 2MW, provided by two electrolysers to be supplied by McPhy.

The electrolysers will be used to produce hydrogen, which according to the company, will initially be utilised in the cold rolling mill, where steel is strengthened by changing its shape without using heat.

The new hydrogen filling station will refuel forklifts of articulated lorries, and oxygen that is generated during electrolysis will be reused on site for production.

“The demonstration plant will serve the use of hydrogen in steel production as well as the logistical use of hydrogen-powered vehicles for steel production.”

Reiner Blaschek, CEO of ArcelorMittal Germany

“The demonstration plant will serve the use of hydrogen in steel production as well as the logistical use of hydrogen-powered vehicles for steel production,” said Reiner Blaschek, CEO of ArcelorMittal Germany.

“With this project, we want to show and test the possibilities of hydrogen in industrial use and further optimise it before production is completely converted to climate neutrality in the coming years with a complete change of technology and the use of more hydrogen,” Blaschek added.

The partners also intend to use the project as a testing ground for newly developed 'smart operating modes'.

The Brandenburg Technical University (BTU) Cottbus-Senftenberg will provide scientific support for the project and will analyse data related to hydrogen use at the plant to increase energy efficiency and support the further development of electrolysers.

“Increasing energy efficiency through the use of intelligent operating modes in electrolysis is a challenging topic that we are very happy to work on scientifically.''

Professor Dr. Lars Röntzsch, BTU Cottbus

“Increasing energy efficiency through the use of intelligent operating modes in electrolysis is a challenging topic that we are very happy to work on scientifically in order to make our contribution so that this important future technology can be used in such an energy-intensive industry as the steel industry enables climate-neutral operation,” commented Professor Dr. Lars Röntzsch, BTU Cottbus.